little things like

Katrina Boemig's practice places the importance of the everyday back into the lives of people confronted by their own mortality, isolation and insular modern lifestyle. She works in social engagement and reflection; she exhibits various media, performance, installation and memory mapping.
Some of her projects follow...

Sep 13
I have been trying to figure out how/if I want to involve color in my memory mappings.  

I have been trying to figure out how/if I want to involve color in my memory mappings.  


Sep 12

I have been creating a 1 hour drawing a day since June.

Yesterday September 11th, 2013 marked the eleventh week of this practice.

I plan on creating a community sharing space for people that are interested in the same or a similar practice.  


The truth drawn out of texts messages and emails
2013
An attempt to get three people to tell the same story over various technological devices.  The information was later translated in a drawing process onto vellum and hung so the story would continue to erode with time and influence as the scrolls are tugged and spun.


This piece (shot in studio) is now on view at The Flying Object in Hadley, MA.  

see:

http://flying-object.org for info


I told you this story before, one mapping, three times
2013
Three panel hand cut mapping of travels from Vermont to Western, Massachusetts, 1995-1996.  These mappings are cut without reference and completely from memory.  The variations you see in the maps are changes in my perception of space during the time in which they are performed.  
This piece (shot in studio) is now on view at The Flying Object in Hadley, MA.  
see:
http://flying-object.org for info

I told you this story before, one mapping, three times

2013
Three panel hand cut mapping of travels from Vermont to Western, Massachusetts, 1995-1996.  These mappings are cut without reference and completely from memory.  The variations you see in the maps are changes in my perception of space during the time in which they are performed.  


This piece (shot in studio) is now on view at The Flying Object in Hadley, MA.  

see:

http://flying-object.org for info


My installation at The Wassaic Project’s “Homeward Found”

For more information on the exhibition see:
http://artforum.com/index.php?pn=picks&id=42357&view=print


Nov 11
I am very happy about the results of the US election.  But I do not like maps being used as a weapon, maps are for telling stories, pie charts are for statistics.  In maps there is room for interpretation, So I made this in reaction.

I am very happy about the results of the US election.  
But I do not like maps being used as a weapon, maps are for telling stories, pie charts are for statistics.  In maps there is room for interpretation, So I made this in reaction.


Oct 29
Can Not Control the Meaning of the Life Process
A collaboration with Katrina Boemig, Yang Xin, Lou Wei, & Necole Zayatz.  2010-2011
Made in Beijing China and Buffalo, NY
Click on image to watch a raw version of the the project as presented in Buffalo.

Can Not Control the Meaning of the Life Process

A collaboration with Katrina Boemig, Yang Xin, Lou Wei, & Necole Zayatz.  2010-2011

Made in Beijing China and Buffalo, NY

Click on image to watch a raw version of the the project as presented in Buffalo.


Oct 28
'How to Walk in Crayon Shoes'
A workshop for children at Big Draw Buffalo
workshop descripiton:
Why can’t realism mean drawing the moment via action? Children will be invited to draw music while dancing, using their feet rather than their hands. Drawings will reveal their emotional reaction to the sound, fellow participants, and the dynamic structure of the workshop. 

'How to Walk in Crayon Shoes'

A workshop for children at Big Draw Buffalo

workshop descripiton:

Why can’t realism mean drawing the moment via action? Children will be invited to draw music while dancing, using their feet rather than their hands. Drawings will reveal their emotional reaction to the sound, fellow participants, and the dynamic structure of the workshop. 


Sep 16
This is the print of the copper floor from the piece Making a Memory from Scratch.  Each section of the print is 36” x 36”The original installaction happened in the fall of 2010 at ATTN:Artgoers.
The piece was printed as a dry point with Jonathan Barcan and Alicia Paolucci in the summer of 2011.
Click on the photo to see images of the installaction as it occurred.  

This is the print of the copper floor from the piece Making a Memory from Scratch.  Each section of the print is 36” x 36”
The original installaction happened in the fall of 2010 at ATTN:Artgoers.

The piece was printed as a dry point with Jonathan Barcan and Alicia Paolucci in the summer of 2011.

Click on the photo to see images of the installaction as it occurred.  


Sep 15
I have walked to Canada three weekends in a row.  It has begun to remind me a bit of the BIG walks I organized with Jill Hannon from 2004-2006.  (There have been some straggler walks since then.)
The major difference between those walks and these walks, other than the purposefulness of crossing a border, is the people.  In New York there was a core group of people I would call the BIG walkers.  They did not go on every walk but they went on almost every walk.  Those walks became rambles and the rambles became an excuse to both see and learn and socialize and move.  They became a way to become part of the giant city in which we lived.
I have often thought about the choice we made when we decided not to bring cameras on those walks.  The conversations about a lens making something less real.  We wanted to have an authentic experience, the walks were not about pointing to them after and saying ‘Look what I did’  But rather they were a memory to hold inside our heads where we could whisper ‘we were there.’
I have been taking pictures on these walks to Canada, though not many.  And every walk has had different people on it.  I am happy to have walked with all of them but, I started these walks knowing I eventually planned on doing them alone. Today when my fellow walkers wanted to get chinese food, I knew I could not afford, I decided to head back alone.  
The clouds were trying to be epic, and the light was that winking yellow you find in the evenings of early autumn.  I walked alone and I was happy.  I arrived back on my street and saw the houses differently I walked back to Buffalo and saw it differently.  And I found myself for the first time, in a long time, not knowing the answer and not caring that I did not even know what the question was to begin with.

I have walked to Canada three weekends in a row.  It has begun to remind me a bit of the BIG walks I organized with Jill Hannon from 2004-2006.  (There have been some straggler walks since then.)

The major difference between those walks and these walks, other than the purposefulness of crossing a border, is the people.  In New York there was a core group of people I would call the BIG walkers.  They did not go on every walk but they went on almost every walk.  Those walks became rambles and the rambles became an excuse to both see and learn and socialize and move.  They became a way to become part of the giant city in which we lived.

I have often thought about the choice we made when we decided not to bring cameras on those walks.  The conversations about a lens making something less real.  We wanted to have an authentic experience, the walks were not about pointing to them after and saying ‘Look what I did’  But rather they were a memory to hold inside our heads where we could whisper ‘we were there.’

I have been taking pictures on these walks to Canada, though not many.  And every walk has had different people on it.  I am happy to have walked with all of them but, I started these walks knowing I eventually planned on doing them alone. Today when my fellow walkers wanted to get chinese food, I knew I could not afford, I decided to head back alone.  

The clouds were trying to be epic, and the light was that winking yellow you find in the evenings of early autumn.  I walked alone and I was happy.  I arrived back on my street and saw the houses differently I walked back to Buffalo and saw it differently.  And I found myself for the first time, in a long time, not knowing the answer and not caring that I did not even know what the question was to begin with.


Sep 10
Started on the last weekend of summer 2012.  
Walk the bridge to another world is a public occasion for acceptable border crossing.
I invite fellow Buffalonians to cross the Peace Bridge together- arriving on foot in a foreign country.  
In Buffalo seeing Fort Erie, Canada is more common than eating one of our famed Buffalo wings- Yet I found when talking to friends that most of us had never made land fall in Fort Erie.  
Initially I wanted to walk to Canada out of curiosity but eventually I began to think about the absurdity of borders and the ease in which the U.S. northern border can be crossed vs. the U.S. southern border.
Walk the bridge to another world  began as research for a project in which I plan to walk to Canada everyday until I fill a completely blank passport with stamps* but it has developed a life of it’s own.
So far we have found fossil beds, an abandoned amusement park and the best chinese food I have had outside of China and the City of New York.  It’s worth walking with us.
* This project has been postponed but not abandoned.

Started on the last weekend of summer 2012.  

Walk the bridge to another world is a public occasion for acceptable border crossing.

I invite fellow Buffalonians to cross the Peace Bridge together- arriving on foot in a foreign country.  

In Buffalo seeing Fort Erie, Canada is more common than eating one of our famed Buffalo wings- Yet I found when talking to friends that most of us had never made land fall in Fort Erie.  

Initially I wanted to walk to Canada out of curiosity but eventually I began to think about the absurdity of borders and the ease in which the U.S. northern border can be crossed vs. the U.S. southern border.

Walk the bridge to another world  began as research for a project in which I plan to walk to Canada everyday until I fill a completely blank passport with stamps* but it has developed a life of it’s own.

So far we have found fossil beds, an abandoned amusement park and the best chinese food I have had outside of China and the City of New York.  It’s worth walking with us.

* This project has been postponed but not abandoned.


Circle the Lake was a project I did while at The University at Buffalo.

I sent formal invitations to my classmates asking them to circle the lake with me.  Once we had scheduled a time we walked around the man-made Lake LaSalle, part of UB campus.  I let the invitee control the way in which we circled the lake and the topics of our conversations.  These maps made after returning from our walks are the documentation of a tiny social event, the moment of really beginning to know someone and possibly also, getting to know some place.  There are locative hot topics and natural distractions.  The maps are anonymous.

selection of 9 of the maps.


In the summer of 2012 I made two pieces based on the idea of journaling and calendars.  One piece involved me collecting a rock at every moment that seemed truly important.  The other piece was calledThe Only Days of Summer.  These drawings are from the second piece in which I drew maps from memory of the days I knew I would remember beyond the summer of 2012.


Jun 23

Details of pieces I am working on At The Wassaic Project.  

The cut tarp is called ’ Tool for Memorizing Revolutionary War Songs’

The cut paper and plexi is called ‘Mapping June 2012’

I am memorizing revolutionary war songs that still apply today and singing the tunes in two slate kilns built for iron production during the Revolutionary War.

follow this link to video of kilns:

https://vimeo.com/44587949

For info on The Wassaic Project visit:

http://wassaicproject.org/


May 24

Images from the opening of ’Perspective Stories’ at Buffalo City Hall until July 31st.  For appointment please contact katrinaboemig@gmail.com

‘Perspective Stories’  presents recorded conversations with Buffalo Seniors at Specific Viewpoints in Buffalo City Hall.  The exhibition also explores mapping and what it means to present our subjective experiences or ideas as a map.  

Please Contact katrinab@buffalo.edu to set an appointment.

 ‘Perspective Stories’at Buffalo’s City Hall brings Katrina Boemig’s work in social engagement  together with her addiction to memory mapping and installation.

As you enter the exhibition there is a room on the right in which you will find her installation ‘We Build Bridges Where There Are No Words’   A site-specific mapping installation in which Katrina shows you her remembered movements in the Buffalo area.  The installation itself is hand-cut Tyvek, lazer-cut Tyvek, ink and fabric.

Throughout the rest of the space A selections of audio tracks from The Social Engagement Project ‘Perspective Stories’ play at specific vistas.  Illustrating both the people of Buffalo and a more personal history of the city.  Katrina has been working in collaboration with seniors in the area since 2009.  Perspective Stories’   at Buffalo’s City Hall creates a map of the area by putting conversation into the landscape in locations in which there is known macro-historic information.  These stories will be heard at a birds-eye view traditional of maps of the late 19th century.

Pointing you toward the audio and altering the landscape are black lazer-cuts of redrawn early Buffalo City Plans.  (The Replans) These plans have controlled the way our city is laid out today and therefore alter our everyday experiences.  None of these plans are fully realized in Buffalo today but the theories and planning of their creators surrounds us everyday.  


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